Evolution Ezine
Discover your full potentialCo create a better worldShare your knowledge

Sea/Ocean Vegetables – A Great Source of Minerals by Nadine, N.D., C.N.S.

Black Forest Kelp

Black Kelp Forest

Minerals are basic or essential components of all matter.  They are part of all living tissue as well as existing in their inorganic form in the earth.  Did you know that approximately 4-5 percent of our body weight (skeleton) is mineral matter?  Minerals are what remain as ash when plant or animal tissues are burned or decompose completely after death.  These inorganic elements, or minerals, come from the earth and eventually return to the earth and can most simply be defined as chemical molecules that cannot be reduced to simpler substances.

Minerals are deemed essential when our bodies cannot produce them or produces them in quantities insufficient to support the functions in which they are used.  Most commonly, a mineral is considered essential if deficiency symptoms are seen when it is lacking in the diet and the symptoms resolve when the mineral is resupplied.  The eight macro-minerals are calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, chloride, sulfur, magnesium and silicon.  The trace minerals that are known to be essential include iron, zinc, copper, cobalt, iodine, manganese, chromium, molybdenum and selenium.

Iodine is a good example of a trace mineral whose deficiency creates a disease that is easily corrected by resupplying it in the diet.  Goiter is an enlargement of the thyroid gland that develops when this important metabolic gland does not have enough iodine to manufacture hormones.  We require iodine for the production of thyroid hormones that regulate the metabolic energy of the body and set our basal metabolic rate (BMR).

Life from the ocean waters provides the best source of iodine.  Fish, shellfish, and sea vegetables or seaweed are dependable rich sources.  Kelp in particular is rich in other minerals and low in sodium, making it a great seasoning or substitute for salt.  Sea vegetables and marine super foods like spirulina and chlorella can be viewed as a medicine chest of Premium Nutrition.  Ounce for ounce sea vegetables are higher in essential nutrients than any other food group.  They are vigorous sources of proteins enzymes, antioxidants and amino-acids with whole cell availability.  In addition, sea plants offer your body the basic building blocks for acid/alkaline balance, help regulate body-fluid osmosis, strengthen nerves synapses, assist in digestive and circulatory activity and help reduce cholesterol and regulate blood sugar levels.   Whew! Now you can see why I’m digging these wonderful veggies from the sea.

Types and Uses of Sea Vegetables

agaragar

*

*

Agar-agar ~ is a seaweed combination that is used as a gelling agent in cooking and for deserts.  It is a good place to start with children or folks who are first introducing sea vegetables into their intake.

*

arame

*
Arame ~ is a dark, thin seaweed thread that can be used in soups or salads or mixed with rice, rye, spelt, kamut etc.  It is fairly rich in protein, iodine, calcium and iron and is considered one of the tastier seaweeds with a nutty type of flavor.

*

arame

*
Dulse ~ is a red-purple leaf that is rich in iodine, iron and calcium.  Dulse has a bacon type flavor that is lovely in fresh salads, on sandwiches or in soups.  Dulse does not need to be cooked. Some stores sell this as strips (lovely in salads or just to eat), flakes (great for spicing up omelets or cooking with), or as a powder (used like a spice).  I also used Liquid Dulse with some of my clients as we work to rebalance their thyroid gland

*

hijiki

*
Hijiki ~ is a very mineral-rich, high-fiber seaweed.  The dark, long strands look like thick hairs.  Hijiki is about 10-20 percent protein, contains some vitamin A, and is richest in calcium, iron and phosphorus.  Hijiki has more calcium than any other sea vegetable, and is high in fiber.  Once it is soaked in water, it can be cooked in soup, tossed with vegetables or added to grains.  Hijiki (thicker strand) is very similar to Arame (thinner strand).

*

Kelp ~ is usually used in smaller quantities than other seaweeds and makes a great seasoning. I have found it in many health food stores in ground form that can be sprinkled on your foods as you prepare them.  Kelp has some protein and is very rich in iodine, calcium and potassium, along with some of the B vitamins.

*

kombu

*
Kombu ~ is a richer, meatier, higher-protein seaweed that is incredible as a soup stock or added to beans.  The natural glutamates in Kelp/Kombu help enhance flavors and tenderize beans.  Some folks remove the Kombu, others chop it and reintroduce is as part of the soup/bean mixture.  I have found that combo to be most delightful.  An added benefit to incorporating Kombu in the beans… no need to take Beano since your body can now digest the bean without creating ‘gas’ in your digestive track.. yahoo.

Seaweed baths are nature’s perfect body/psyche balancer.  I enjoy putting Kombu strips in my BATH.  First I boil about 2 cups of water, add 1-2 strips of Kombu and turn off the stove.  After about 15 mins, pour that entire mixture into your bath water.  The sea greens will balance your body chemistry instead of dehydrating it.  The electromagnetic action of the seaweed releases excess body fluids from congested cells, and dissolves fatty wastes through the skin, replacing them with depleted minerals.  The Vitamin K in seaweeds will boost adrenal activity, and maintain hormonal balance.  Seaweed baths stimulate lymphatic drainage and fat burning so you can keep off excess weight, reduce cellulite and rid your body of toxins.  While enjoying this bath, rub the Kombu between your hands to release the gelatinous material within the membranes.  Stand up, rub the gelatin ON places where you are storing toxins/fat/cellulite then sink back into the tub.  Note:  I tried this once with Wakame and ended up with slug… though very pretty was not what I was wanting.  I have found Kombu to be the winner here.

*

nori

*
Nori ~ is one of the most commonly used seaweeds.  The flat sheets can be eaten right out of the package, roasted on the stove top and sprinkled with flavorings of your choice, and are used in the creation of sushi.  The dark sheets are very rich in protein, containing about 50 percent protein and high in fiber.  Nori is very high in Vitamin A, calcium, iodine, iron, and phosphorus, and is one of the sweeter flavors of the seaweeds.

*

nori

*
Wakame ~ this thin flat seaweed, also high in protein, is mainly used in soups.  I have used it in omelets and attempted it in my seaweed bath (did NOT like the thick goo results).  Wakame contains some Vitamin A, lots of calcium, iron and sodium with a bit of Vitamin C as well.

*

*

Where to purchase your Sea Vegetables

ALL Health Food stores will have all of the above Sea Vegetables.  Some of them even have roasted, flavored Nori strips.  Many Oriental markets have a lovely range of items; Food-Coops will have a range in their Herb/Bulk rooms.  Just the other day I found BRAGG SEA KELP DELIGHT seasoning in the spice aisle of Vitamin Cottage.  It is Incredible!!!!  I use it on fish, eggs, turkey, chicken, salad, veggies, etc.  Did I mention It is Incredible!!!!  I also discovered these wonderful Kelp Noodles that add a wet crunch to both hot and cold dishes.

nori

Start with something.  Bring in about 2 TBS of Sea Vegetables into your daily dietary intake.  Take a Kombu Bath.  Play.  Explore.  Create.  Then write me and tell me about your experiences.

In BALANCE, CREATIVITY and YUM-YUM

~Dr Nadine

JOY, Empowerment and Inspiration await you within the SOUL Food deck one by NADINE, N.D., C.N.S. The app is a beautiful deck of 66 cards providing Soulful Nourishment for the Body, Mind, Emotions and Spirit. Available NOW for your iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch devices. If the link does not work for you enter SOUL FOOD + NADINE in the search window within iTunes.

NADINE is a Naturopath and Holistic Nutrition Specialist with over 30 years experience in the Health and Fitness Industry and teaches her clients the Art of building and maintaining lean muscle tissue as they drop body fat in a unique program designed for them. Nadine has coached all levels and genre of people and has taught a variety of programs including but not limited to Personal and Sports Nutrition, Sports Psychology, and Weight Lifting/Bodybuilding. Nadine is available for seminars and workshops based on availability. For more information contact Dr NADINE at 970-443-2541, email: Nadine@CoachNadine.com or visit www.coachnadine.com

and to sign up for Dr. Nadine’s newsletter visit: Dr. Nadine’s Nuggets

PLEASE NOTE: Universal Copyright 2010 is authorized here. Please distribute freely as long as both the author and masteringalchemy.com is included as the resource and this information is distributed on a non-commercial no charge basis.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 6.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Sea/Ocean Vegetables – A Great Source of Minerals by Nadine, N.D., C.N.S., 6.0 out of 10 based on 1 rating
Return to Home Page

2 Responses to “Sea/Ocean Vegetables – A Great Source of Minerals by Nadine, N.D., C.N.S.”

  1. Helen says:

    Am highly allergic to iodine – how can I supplement to avoid becoming ill? Cannot even eat spinach or any seafood and have to watch for iodised salts.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
  2. Leila says:

    Thanks for this very informative article about seaweed. I would love to buy some in packets as you suggest rather than in a powdered form. It sounds interesting to use.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Leave a Reply

© Copyright 2013 EvolutionEzine.com. All rights reserved. mind power mp3